Mind The Gap | What Was the Agreement That Settled the Argument between the Virginia and New Jersey Plans
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What Was the Agreement That Settled the Argument between the Virginia and New Jersey Plans

What Was the Agreement That Settled the Argument between the Virginia and New Jersey Plans

In order to fully understand the agreement that settled the argument between the Virginia and New Jersey Plans, it is important to understand the historical context in which these plans were proposed.

During the Constitutional Convention of 1787, a major debate arose between the large and small states over how representation in the United States Congress should be determined. The large states, such as Virginia, argued that representation should be based on population, while the small states, such as New Jersey, argued that each state should have an equal voice regardless of population.

In response to these competing views, two plans were proposed: the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan. The Virginia Plan, put forth by James Madison, favored a bicameral legislature with representation in both houses based on population. The New Jersey Plan, on the other hand, proposed a unicameral legislature with each state having one vote.

The debate between the two plans was settled by what is now known as the Great Compromise, or the Connecticut Compromise. This agreement proposed a bicameral legislature, with a House of Representatives based on population and a Senate with equal representation for each state.

Under the Great Compromise, the number of representatives in the House would be determined by each state`s population, as determined by a census taken every ten years. The Senate, on the other hand, would have two senators from each state, regardless of population.

This compromise was crucial in getting the Constitution ratified by all the states. The large states were satisfied with the House of Representatives, which gave them more representation based on their larger populations. The small states were satisfied with the equal representation in the Senate, which ensured that their voices would be heard.

In conclusion, the Great Compromise was the agreement that settled the argument between the Virginia and New Jersey Plans. Its proposal of a bicameral legislature, with representation based on both population and equality, helped to unite the states and create a more stable and democratic government. Today, it remains a crucial part of the United States Constitution and a testament to the art of compromise in American politics.